cosmetic neurology


cosmetic neurology
n.
The use of pharmaceuticals to enhance cognitive function in a healthy brain.
Example Citations:
Still, even if you acknowledge that cosmetic neurology is here to stay, there is something dispiriting about the way the drugs are used—the kind of aspirations they open up, or don't. Jonathan Eisen, an evolutionary biologist at U.C. Davis, is skeptical of what he mockingly calls "brain doping."
—Margaret Talbot, " Brain Gain: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2009/04/27/090427fa_fact_talbot," The New Yorker, April 27, 2009
Plastic surgery was also pioneered to tackle a serious medical problem, the horrendous facial injuries suffered by combatants in the First World War, but has since become an accepted technique to improve on nature and hold back age.
Cosmetic neurology may be next. Don't like the shape of your remembrance of things past? Give your memory a nip and tuck.
—Ben Macintyre, " I won't give my memory a nip and tuck: http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/columnists/ben_macintyre/article2033963.ece," The Times (London), July 6, 2007
Earliest Citation:
Advances in cognitive neuroscience and neuropharmacology are yielding exciting treatments for neurologic diseases. Many of these treatments are also likely to have uses for people without disease. Here, I review the ways in which medicine might make bodies and brains function better by modulating motor, cognitive, and affective systems. These potential "quality of life" interventions raise ethical concerns, some related to the individual and others related to society. Despite these concerns, I argue that major restraints on the development of cosmetic neurology are not likely.
—Anjan Chatterjee, " Cosmetic neurology: http://ccn.upenn.edu/cosmetic neurologychatterjee/anjan_pdfs/CosmeticNeurology.pdf" (PDF), Department of Neurology and the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, The University of Pennsylvania, January 8, 2004
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  • cosmetic neurology — /kɒzˌmɛtɪk njuˈrɒlədʒi/ (say koz.metik nyooh roluhjee) noun neurology concerned with methods of enhancing normal brain function. –cosmetic neurologist, noun …   Australian English dictionary

  • Cosmetic pharmacology — Cosmetic psychopharmacology, a term coined in 1990 by the psychiatrist Peter D. Kramer and popularized in his 1993 book Listening to Prozac, refers to the use of drugs to move persons from a normal psychological state to another normal state that …   Wikipedia

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  • Neuroethics — is the ethics of neuroscience, and the neuroscience of ethics.[1] The ethics of neuroscience deals with matters as a subclass of bioethics. Examples include the issue treatment for via the administration of psychopharmaceuticals substances, or… …   Wikipedia

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  • perma-youth — (PUR.muh yooth; th as in thin) n. An appearance of youthfulness maintained over time by using cosmetic surgery; a person who maintains such an appearance. adj. Relating to such an appearance. Also: permayouth. Example Citation: The book Eat to… …   New words

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